WORLD SUICIDE PREVENTION DAY 10 SEPTEMBER 2018

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World Suicide Prevention Day is observed on September 10 each year to promote worldwide action to prevent suicides. Various events and activities are held during this occasion to raise awareness that suicide is a major preventable cause of premature death.

World Suicide Prevention Day is observed on September 10 each year to promote worldwide action to prevent suicides. Various events and activities are held during this occasion to raise awareness that suicide is a major preventable cause of premature death.

What do people do?

World Suicide Prevention Day gives organizations, government agencies and individuals a chance to promote awareness about suicide, mental illnesses associated with suicide, as well as suicide prevention. Organizations such as the International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP) and World Health Organization (WHO) play a key role in promoting this event.

Events and activities for World Suicide Prevention Day include:

  • The launch of new government initiatives to prevent suicide.
  • Conferences, open days, educational seminars or public lectures.
  • Media programs promoting suicide awareness and prevention.
  • Memorial services or candlelight ceremonies to remember those who died from suicide.
  • Organizing cultural or spiritual events, fairs or exhibitions.
  • Launches of publications about suicide awareness and prevention.
  • Training courses about suicide and depression awareness.

Many of these initiatives are celebrated in various countries worldwide. Some of these events and activities are held at a local level, while others are nation-wide. Many communities around the world reaffirm their commitment to suicide prevention on World Suicide Prevention Day.

Background

Nearly 3000 people on average commit suicide daily, according to WHO. For every person who completes a suicide, 20 or more may attempt to end their lives. About one million people die by suicide each year. Suicide is a major preventable cause of premature death which is influenced by psycho-social, cultural and environmental risk factors that can be prevented through worldwide responses that address these main risk factors. There is strong evidence indicating that adequate prevention can reduce suicide rates.

World Suicide Prevention Day, which first started in 2003, is annually held on September 10 each year as an IASP initiative. WHO co-sponsors this event. World Suicide Prevention Day aims to:

  • Raise awareness that suicide is preventable.
  • Improve education about suicide.
  • Spread information about suicide awareness.
  • Decrease stigmatization regarding suicide.

WHO and IASP work with governments and other partners to ensure that suicide is no longer stigmatized, criminalized or penalized. WHO’s role is to build political action and leadership to develop national responses to prevent suicide, strengthen national planning capacity to establish the core building blocks of such a national response, and build the national capacities to implement these responses.

How can you get involved?

This year is the first WSPD with the theme “Working Together to Prevent Suicide.”  This theme will be retained for WSPD in 2019 and 2020. We have chosen this theme as it highlights the most essential ingredient for effective global suicide prevention- collaboration. We all have a role to play and together we can collectively address the challenges presented by suicidal behaviour in society today.  On September 10th, join with us and many others across the world who are playing their part in the prevention of suicide. Be sure to involve or invite other local organisations and collaborators to organise an event to mark WSPD 2018.

Go to https://iasp.info/wspd2018/ to register and download more information.

Update from Katherine

It’s been a while since I wrote anything. I have to admit I have missed writing and interacting with you all.

It has been a very difficult few months for me since the birth of my miracle son last year. In that short space of time I have suffered ill-health, the deaths of both grandmothers and a battled with my depression. It would also appear that I have post-natal depression too.

I forgot to mention I went back to work full time when my son was only 3 months old. Was this too soon? Hell yes, but financially we couldn’t cope if I stayed off longer and took statutory maternity pay.

Having all these events happen in such a short space of time has definitely had an impact on me. I still having come to terms with my grandmas passing in February. I was completely and utterly knocked for 6 and it has left a hole that cannot be filled. Then my second grandma passed in May. I have all these wonderful memories to keep them alive forever but it’s not the same.

My work life balance doesn’t exist. I was great at keeping everything separate but they seem to have mingled into one. When I’m at work all I can think about is the little one and when I’m with him it’s the opposite and I’m thinking about work.

Most days I wake only to wish I could climb back into bed and sleep a little while longer. I must admit I have slept a lot more than I normally do but I’m always tired. Typical side effect of depression – people just think you’re lazy but there’s just so much to it.

I’ve also decided to take this blog into a new direction. I will still focus on elements of mental health awareness but it won’t be the primary element. I am going to reclassify as a lifestyle blogger which means I can cover a lot of the items that I’m passionate about. This includes products reviews, family day out ideas and ill-health (physical and mental).

I look forward to hearing from you all soon.

Katherine xo

World Mental Health Awareness Day 2017 – male depression

Well it wouldn’t be a mental health awareness blog without some more mental health awareness would it 😊

Today is mental awareness awareness day or 10th October 2017 to the rest of you. This day is used to help raise awareness of a multitude of areas connected to mental health. It isn’t a day to start pointing the finger at people and calling them names!!

At some point you or someone you know will suffer from a mental health illness. Whether it is stress, depression, anxiety or something much more. We all need to to work together to tackle the stigma. Mental health illness does not make you weak or inferior. It doesn’t just affect women a lot of men suffer in silence afraid of what others may think. Guys if real men wear pink then even realer men reveal their emotions! Go on let out a cry if you need too and talk to someone about it!

I am using today to raise awareness of men’s suffering. Why should they suffer? What makes them different from women? Well to be honest I can’t personally speak for every man out there and clearly I’m not one but I suspect it comes down to gender stereotyping. Men are expected to be all macho and never reveal their emotions – well perhaps dodgy humour is permitted in some circumstances. However, generally the ‘man of the house’ is to be the bread winner, the one who chairs his household like a godfather. Everyone comes to him with their problems and he has all the answers. Well the truth is men you’re not so dissimilar to us women. We’re ‘expected’ to know the answers (think childcare etc), were suppose to keep the house together (housework).

We shouldn’t conform to any gender stereotyping we should just be who we want to be. Some women are more dominant in their family and the men more care givers. Nothing wrong with this!!!

Men you can cry, laugh and shout out loud. You are allowed to have breakdowns although we’d prefer it that you seek help before that happens. You can feel insecure about your body (by the way the ideal man in most women’s eyes isn’t some 6ft body builder, most of us like a man with the six pack in the fridge). You can feel down in the dumps, stressed etc just talk to someone. Communication is key to getting better. You wouldn’t leave a broken foot unseen so don’t try to stick a plaster over your mind and assume it will heal by itself.

I’m obviously no mental health expert or therapist but I encourage people to just talk to their peers. I can guarantee you are not the only one in your friendship circle to be suffering in silence.

Possible triggers (no particular order):

  • Marriage / relationship breakdown
  • Domestic violence
  • Abuse
  • Bullying / harassment
  • Redundancy
  • Illness
  • Bereavement
  • Self esteem / body issues
  • Change in family (new baby, marriage)
  • Parents divorcing
  • Alcohol or something balance abuse

Nothing above is any different for a man or woman to suffer depression it’s just men don’t talk about it.

Us women are great talkers (ok not all of us), we have a natter with our girlies and generally try to put the world to rights over a cuppa tea. Men you tend to kick a ball around or have a pint or two but not generally talk feelings it’s more shop talk (sex, that woman’s boobs, tv, sport etc). Now correct me if I’m wrong but it’s rare that’s I’ve known men to have a heart to heart with the lads about their marriage breakdown, girlfriend troubles, erectile dysfunction, grief etc. You seem to pop those issues on a shelf to gather dust and let it get worse and worse. Why? I would really like for you to reach out to me and explain why. Is it because you are deeply private individuals or is there more to it. Is it more to do with gender stereotyping that men shouldn’t talk about these things? In today’s society I believe men and women are equal to talk about their feelings. It’s natural to talk (some more than others). If the second in line to be king of England can share his feelings with the nation then surely you can open up to your best mate. Even if you don’t want to talk to your wife / girlfriend or partner at least chat to your bestie that’s what friends are for. True friends won’t judge you and probably relate to you more than you think. It’s like that old age phrase ask the question because you can guarantee someone else is thinking the same. There’s also no such thing as a stupid question just one that’s left unanswered.

So men reach out and have a chat with your nearest and dearest (or GP). You’ll not be locked away and thrown in a padded cell for having voices in your head. You can be helped but only if you choose to seek help.

If you’re a man suffering with depression and would like to reach out and share you’re story why not get in contact with me. I could always do with a regular male voice on the blog.

Katherine xo

6 Top tips for self managing stress or depression

Are you living with stress and want to know some self help top tips.

1. Notice your individual triggers

We all have little triggers that set us off but to help you manage stress you should try to hone in on what sets you off. Is it the useless printer at work or the way a colleague speaks to you. Find out so you can manage it.

2. List your worries

This is probably an easy task for someone who perhaps kept a journal in their youth. This tip is all about jotting down your worries. If you can see them written down you can look at setting some goals to do something about them.

3. Be better organised

It is true that the more organised an individual the less stressed they become. Start with to do lists and list out all the big and little tasks that you need to do. Start with the most interesting and easy win tasks to help build your confidence up. For example if one task is to clean the house why not sort out one room (or even make that task smaller by just sorting a drawer). Once you’ve achieved that task why not see how long you can keep that room / area tidy then move on to another room. Break tasks down into manageable and achievable goals.

4. Get active

This gets said so often that it goes unnoticed at times. Physical health and mental health are linked. If your physically more active this releases endorphins which are the happy hormones. This can help your overall wellbeing.

5. Have a rest

Your not superman (or superwoman) you don’t need to do everything all at once. As mentioned in point 3 break tasks down into management targets. Don’t be afraid to have a nap at lunch time if you need it. You need to have physical strength to tackle mental tasks.

You should also try and mix up you breaks at work. Can you go for a stroll at lunch time. Read a book in the canteen / staff room? Meet a friend for coffee at the local coffee shop? These little changes in location can have a positive impact on your working afternoon.

6. Praise yourself

It’s a well known fact that society is so focused on bad feedback that we rarely stop and say I did a good job today.

Why not gloat about your achievements – write them down. Give your self brownie points (or gold stars). Don’t feel ashamed if your achievement was something as little as walked from a bus stop one stop earlier than normal. It’s your personal achievement not someone else’s. If you start to look more positively of yourself it will show.

Lastly Get talking

Now this step is not easy! Some people are able to talk to anyone including perfect strangers about their issues. If you’re not one of these people why not look at social media. Could you take to blogging?

Katherine xo